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About the Parish

Udimore is a small Sussex village, reputedly the second longest in England. Situated in the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, just west of the historic port of Rye, the village sits astride the ridge running between the River Tillingham to the north and the River Brede to the south, providing beautiful views over pastoral Sussex.

Brede Valley
Bede Valley view to Udimore

The Brede and Tillingham valleys were once seawater estuaries and conduits for cargoes of timber, iron ore, coal and implements. Over the last 500 years, the waterways have been channeled, sluiced and drained, providing broad, fertile valley bottoms for pasture and arable farming. Above, along the ridge, the characteristic Wealden pattern of coppiced woods and seasonal pasture, has hardly been disturbed since pre-historic times.

The identity of the village is primarily rural residential. There are many beautiful old dwellings dating from the15th Century through to the Victorian era and beyond, some of which are of significant architectural and historical interest. Several working farms exist in the village, producing various crops, sheep, cattle, soft fruit and hops, with one orchard growing apples and pears.

Although there is no village centre and no longer a Post Office, shop, restaurant, garage, or many buses, there is a nursery school, a number of Bed and Breakfast establishments and other small enterprises, including several artists who live and work in the village.

There is a community hall, St Mary's Hall, next to the church, which is managed by trustees and can be booked by email at: udimorehallbooking@gmail.com 

In 2011 the population profile was:

  • 397 people, occupying 176 households
  • 0 to 14 years - 18.4% (73);
  • 15 to 64 years - 60.7% (241);
  • 65 and over - 20.9% (83)

The population has changed little in the last 150 years. In 1851 it was 374 and in 1965 it was 391

The area of the village is 1,171 hectares, with a population density of 0.3 persons per hectare.